Siguiendo al dolar

Jesus AT

Well-Known Member
:) Arkady no me entendiste o me esplique mal. Es evidente lo que comentas y de hecho se esas cifras. Y por eso las comparo con las que tengo sobre usa y me da cuanto menos "grima" :D

En fin de todas maneras y sin profundizar mucho. Dices que recibirán 24500 millones en ayudas no? Bueno indistintamente es un dinero que en teoría se retornara sin entrar evidentemente en cuando ocurrirá eso. Pero te hago otra pregunta. Cuanto se devolvera de los 50.0000.milloncitos del caso madoff por ejemplo :D ..... Y de estos a usa le van a salir alguno mas.

Yo creo que es a parte de crisis una batalla de la informacion que invade los medios. Y ahora toca meternos con eso. Veremos al final quien tiene el pufo mas gordo. Aunque yo ya lo se. jejeje

Un saludo



-Jesus AT-

Entiendo que no podemos tener toda la información ni conocer la infinita serie de circunstancias economicas y politicas asociadas con esta crisis mundial, el tema es bastante complicado.

Lo que se refieren con la "enfermedad de la Europa del este" es sin mas ni menos que los bancos de muchos paises de la Europa occidental financiaron el extraordinario crecimiento economico de estos paises en los ultimos años y ahora con la crisis estos paises con economias mas débiles son evidentemente los más afectados. Con sus monedas devaluadas devolver los 1,6 Billones de euros que se les prestó supone un esfuerzo descomunal que no todos pueden afrontar.

Entonces para los paises de la Europa occidental es bastante perjudicial el añadir a la crisis ese componente de falta de devolución de esos créditos y esa es "nuestra" enfermedad.

Por ej. Austria es uno de los paises mas afectados por la crisis del este porque muchos de sus bancos estan implantados en Ucrania, Rumania y Bulgaria.

Los paises del este han basado su crecimineto en la dependencia del capital extranjero y la mayoria de sus bancos (que recibiran 24.500millones de € en ayudas internacionales) estan en manos de entidades austriacas, alemanaas, belgas, italianas, holandesas, francesas, griegas, portuguesas y españolas.

P.D se nota mucho que precisamente hoy me he leido varios articulos que tratan esactamente de lo mismo??
 
Última edición:

Arkady

Member
xddd, lo ideal seria que devolvieran los 1,6 billones de euros antes que la ayuda pero vamos la cosa no es quien tiene un marron mas gordo sino que poco a poco se saneen las economias y volvamos a un estado mas normalizado. Aunque claro, cuando se vuelva a normalizar la economia volvera a subir el euribor :( ...espero haber conseguido mi hmd para entonces :rolleyes:
 

nase

Member
Financial burdens will continue dollar's long-term decline

Quizás te interese Jesus, si no me equivoco sigues en $.

Tuesday, March 3, 2009

GLOBAL ECONOMY SYMPOSIUM
Financial burdens will continue dollar's long-term decline

By TAKASHI KITAZUME
Staff writer

The dollar is likely to be on a downtrend over the long term as the United States faces a massive fiscal burden from its efforts to recover from the financial crisis and to pay for its wars overseas, experts told a recent seminar in Tokyo.

News photo
Eiji Ogawa SATOKO KAWASAKI PHOTOS

The financial crisis has put in doubt the mechanism under which the U.S. economy has for so long attracted funds from abroad to make up for the shortage in domestic savings, and finance its investments and consumption, they said.

Eiji Ogawa, a professor of Hitotsubashi University Graduate School of Commerce and Management, and Jitsuro Terashima, chairman of the Japan Research Institute, discussed the global financial crisis and Japan's possible responses during the Feb. 13 seminar organized by the Keizai Koho Center.

Ogawa explained how the ongoing crisis is linked to the problem of global imbalances — or namely, the U.S. incurring current account deficits while East Asia, plus oil-producing economies in recent years, posted surpluses.

The U.S. current account deficits started to increase in the late 1990s amid excessive private-sector investment during the information technology boom, Ogawa said.

When the IT bubble burst, the U.S. government resorted to aggressive fiscal stimulus and easy monetary policies to make up for the fall in private-sector investment, sharply increasing the budget deficit in the early years of this decade, he said. The current account deficit increased further as the budget deficit expanded faster than the shrinkage of investments, he added.

Then came the housing investment boom of 2003-2005 — or the housing bubble — which is of course closely linked to the current subprime loan woes, Ogawa told the audience.

During the housing boom, money from East Asian countries like Japan and China financed the U.S. budget deficits — but mainly through investments in safe assets like government bonds, Ogawa said.

Meanwhile, European financial institutions, including those from the City of London, channeled abundant oil money from the Middle East and Russia into U.S. housing investments, he said. Therefore, the balance sheets of European banks were also hurt when the subprime mortgage problem surfaced in 2007 and following the September 2008 Lehman Brothers shock, he added.

This is why, according to Ogawa, the dollar's exchange rate did not collapse even though the financial crisis originated in the U.S. What happened instead was the sharp fall of the euro as European financial institutions had trouble securing dollars, he said.

Ogawa said several scenarios have been considered for the future course of the dollar's exchange rate.

A "crisis scenario" — often mentioned right after the Lehman shock of September — anticipated a dollar crash because the U.S.-originated financial crisis would ruin trust in the U.S. currency, but such a situation did not materialize, he said.

On the other hand, there is a "soft-landing scenario" under which shrinking housing investment, consumer spending and capital investment in the U.S. will pare excessive American consumption and investments, thereby reducing its current account deficit while having a relatively small impact on the dollar, he said.

The most realistic scenario, however, would be a long-term decline of the dollar's exchange rate, he said. Given that the huge fiscal cost of cleaning up the mess from the crisis would likely increase the U.S. budget deficit — perhaps up to 10 percent of gross domestic product — in coming years, the dollar would eventually have to fall over the long term, according to Ogawa.

News photo
Jitsuro Terashima

Ogawa said that at least for the time being, the dollar-based system of international settlement will be maintained. But the question remains whether Asia can continue to rely on the dollar, and Asian countries will need to step up regional cooperation for financial stability, he added.

Terashima, also president of the Mitsui Global Strategic Studies Institute, pointed to the enormity of the fiscal burden to be imposed on the new U.S. administration of President Barack Obama.

Citing an estimate by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz that the U.S. would eventually have to spend up to $3 trillion to finish the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Terashima said the huge cost would weight heavily on the new administration also tasked with pulling the U.S. economy out of the crisis.

The total amount of the various commitments using public funds to stabilize the U.S. financial system — such as public loans and guarantees — has reached $8 trillion, he said. Although this does not automatically mean an immediate fiscal burden of this scale, the total potential risk to the federal coffers from these efforts and the wars — coupled with the cost of the stimulus package recently signed by Obama — is roughly equivalent to double Japan's annual GDP, he added.

Of the twin U.S. deficits, Obama last week forecast a $1.75 trillion budget deficit for fiscal 2009 — the biggest amount since World War II — and predicted the deficit would fall in fiscal 2010 but still remain huge at $1.17 trillion.

There are suggestions that the deficit would stay above $1 trillion for several years, Terashima said. The question is how to finance the massive deficit, and the U.S., due to its savings shortage, will have to rely on overseas sources — or namely, countries like Japan, China and oil-rich nations — to buy the U.S. government bonds to finance the deficits, he pointed out.

Despite the twin deficits, the U.S. economy has managed to survive because the capital account surplus more than made up for the current account deficit — namely, the inflow of funds from around the world through the New York financial markets, Terashima noted.

This inflow has long been attributed to a number of factors — including the dollar's role as an international currency, he said. But at least one of these factors — the interest rate differentials between the U.S. and other major economies — has diminished as the Federal Reserve rapidly cut its rates to as low as zero in response to the crisis since last fall, he added.

Also, people in the financial industry have often mentioned what they called the "maturity" of New York's markets, Terashima pointed out.

GLOBAL ECONOMY SYMPOSIUM
Falling U.S. demand, investment challenges export-driven Asia

Even small credit unions in rural Japan are known to have invested in subprime loan-related financial products in the U.S., and the reason why they even managed their money in the New York markets in the first place is that they had been attracted to what was touted as a wide-ranging "lineup" of financial product options there that are not available in Japan, he said. But the reality was that such a lineup included the securitized products using the subprime loans, he added.

So what happened to the credibility of the markets? The result was that the capital account surplus in fiscal 2008 stood at $683.2 billion — not big enough to offset the current account deficit of $697.9 billion, Terashima said. This could mean the end of the structure that enabled the U.S. to continue consumption beyond its industrial power — like a bleeding patient kept alive on blood transfusions now suffering from anemia because he is losing more blood than is being given to him, he added.

Terashima noted, however, that the capability of the U.S. to present itself as a country full of new investment opportunities — and thereby attract money from around the globe — should not be underestimated.

In this sense, the so-called Green New Deal proposals for massive federal spending on clean energy technologies as a way to accelerate moves toward energy efficiency, renewable energy and a sustainable low-carbon economy should be closely watched to see if they have the potential to create a massive industrial-technological paradigm shift in coming years, Terashima said. And these are the areas where Japan has the technological edge and potential for greater industrial cooperation with the U.S., he added.

Saludos
Nase
 

Jesus AT

Well-Known Member
Muchas gracias Nase, pues en eso estamos:). Y rescato este párrafo, Asia esta manteniendo el dolar con alfileres. Y claro, para mi desgracia demasiado tiempo. :D Evidentemente si lo mandan a paseo el perjudicado será el cruce $ vs Y y en esto Japón tiene mucho que decir pues no le interesa volver a ver los 85. Así que me parece que mientras las 2 principales economías se reparten el bacalao yo me tendré que conformar con menos...... Y salir al euro o ir buscando las habichuelas por otra parte. :rolleyes:

Pero bueno por debajo de 1.25 tendría que salir pues mas o menos seria cuanta con paga. Pero claro después de arriesgarme me jode fallar por 2ª vez :D en fin...... seguiremos buscando.

Saludos a [email protected]



Quizás te interese Jesus, si no me equivoco sigues en $.


News photo
Jitsuro Terashima

Ogawa said that at least for the time being, the dollar-based system of international settlement will be maintained. But the question remains whether Asia can continue to rely on the dollar, and Asian countries will need to step up regional cooperation for financial stability, he added.
Saludos
Nase
 

YEN-CHF

Member
Hola a todos.

Pego el comentario que ha colgado Tagoriana en el hilo del CHF yos planteo una cuestión, al hilo del artículo que ha colgado Nase y que ha comentado Jesus AT

La tendencia de fondo en el gráfico histórico del cambio Euro Franco Suizo es bajista, sin embargo, así como en el caso del gráfico histórico del Euro Yen es más complejo hacerse una idea clara de cómo operar en el largo plazo con dicha paridad, en el caso del cambio Euro Franco Suizo, las estrategias son relativamente sencillas.

La ruptura a la baja del amplio movimiento lateral que figura en el gráfico histórico del cambio Euro Franco Suizo (zona 1,40) nos dará idea de que muy probablemente su cotización quiera continuar descendiendo, y que cualquier deuda referenciada a esta divisa, por ejemplo una Hipoteca Multidivisa, debe reconsiderarse.

El hecho de que, al igual que en el caso del Yen, durante los últimos dos años los Bancos han incentivado especialmente la apertura de Hipotecas Multidivisa en Francos (los Bancos se han colocado bajistas en la paridad Euro Franco Suizo - EURCHF), nos debe dar la primera señal de aviso de que, llegado el caso, no debemos ser reacios a cambiar de moneda dicha deuda.


La ruptura a la baja de la zona 1,40 en el gráfico histórico del cambio Euro Franco Suizo, nos debe dar la segunda, y probablemente definitiva señal de que ya no hay que estar alcistas a largo plazo en esta paridad.

Yo sali a CHF desde yenes y con la subida del USD/JPY por ahora no se ven opciones de vuelta al YEN, con lo que me he planteado el salto al DOLAR, ahora que se esta apreciando.

La pregunta del millon es hasta que nivel se debería apreciar, 1.23 llegará a 1.15.

Todos los análisis que se cuelgan dicen que llegará a 1.15-1.20, pero la impresión generalizada que tenemos todos y que parece que coincide con el artículo anterior de NASE, es que es irreal, que debería haber caido en vez de apreciarse.

Los que controlais el técnico, ¿veis agotamiento en el movimiento apreciatorio, o creeis que tiene recorrido al alza, para despues caer otra vez sobre los 1.4 mas o menos.?
 

AIRIS

Active Member
Ay, Dios mío, compañeros multidiviseros. Por favor, mucha prudencia y mucha paciencia.
YEN-CHF, recuerdo muy bien tu paso a francos porque fui una de las personas que te di mi opinión para decirte que te lo desaconsejaba porque en ese momento estaba "forzadamente" muy barato. Supongo qua aumentarías tu deuda con tu salida del yen (como todos) y si ahora sales del franco te ocurriría lo mismo.
Si necesitas realmente refugiarte en alguna moneda, por supuesto que, como de sobra sabes, la única opción es el euro.
Si quieres aprovechar los grandes recorridos de cotización de las divisas para compensar las pérdidas, piensa en lo difícil que está la cosa. Creo que es esto lo que buscas.

Puede que el dólar se deprecie estrepitosamente, pero puede que se convierta en una divisa prometedora codiciada por todos....
Lo peor es que estamos especulando con nuestras casas y el riesgo es inmenso.
La cosa está fea, y se puede poner más fea.
Yo no tengo ni idea de técnico, luego mi opinión te importará un pimiento pero sólo quería decirte que mi experiencia es ésta:
Entré en CHF a 1.54 y salí a 1.65. Muy bien, rebajé mi deuda.
Entré en JPY a 1.64 y aquí sigo.

Si hubiese permanecido en Francos, mi deuda se hubiera incrementado en 19000 euros y a día de hoy, con mis yenes mi deuda se incrementó más de 50000. La diferencia es enorme.

Seguramente no te servirá de gran cosa mi apunte, pero bueno, son sólo unas líneas más en el foro.
Saludos.
 

Jesus AT

Well-Known Member
Veamos amigos. Os doy mi visión de la situación que no tiene porque ser la buena. YO ahora mismo estoy mas fuera que dentro del $ amigos. Entrar en el dolar ahora no es una opción, lo siento pero ya en su día dije que era arriesgadisimo y pura especulación. A los hechos me remito y de hecho Maaad no se si finalmente me hizo caso. Pero de momento los números son los que son y si no estuviese cubierto en divisa mi deuda seria casi un 5% mas.

Que quiero decir con esto? pues que por mas que uno cree en que el $ se va a la mierda por las continuas noticias parece que es imposible tumbarlo de su pedestal. Y dentro de esa incongruencia por ese comportamiento anómalo es cuanto menos increíble no pensar en esa posibilidad (que se deprecie) Pero no lo esta haciendo amigos y no veo mas allá...... Así que esto es toda una incógnita y en serio si queréis mirar el gráfico lo miramos pero a mi de momento si no es en el soporte de largo plazo ( 1.21) yo ni me lo plantearía.

Como bien decis el refugio es el € pues al menos a mi me lo parece que es el que se tiene que llevar las leches durante un tiempo.

Saludos y espero no haber liado mas la cosa :D pero es como lo siento.
 
Última edición:

otroyenero

Active Member
Que quiero decir con esto? pues que por mas que uno cree en que el $ se va a la mierda por las continuas noticias parece que es imposible tumbarlo de su pedestal. Y dentro de esa incongruencia por ese comportamiento anómalo es cuanto menos increíble no pensar en esa posibilidad (que se deprecie) Pero no lo esta haciendo amigos y no veo mas allá...... Así que esto es toda una incógnita y en serio si queréis mirar el gráfico lo miramos pero a mi de momento si no es en el soporte de largo plazo ( 1.21) yo ni me lo plantearía.

Como bien decis el refugio es el € pues al menos a mi me lo parece que es el que se tiene que llevar las leches durante un tiempo.

Saludos y espero no haber liado mas la cosa :D pero es como lo siento.
Joder Jesus, que desalentador es tu post; sin embargo gracias.
 

Jesus AT

Well-Known Member
Hombre no pretendía serlo :confused: solo ser sincero en lo que decía. A lo mejor yo estoy pensando en salir y lo mismo salgo y esto tira para arriba. Pero de momento no me quiero precipitar pues tenemos que ajustar esta nueva situación. A lo mejor el € aguanta por encima de 1.25

Así que como siempre digo... cada uno con su salchicha.

Saludos Jesus


Joder Jesus, que desalentador es tu post; sin embargo gracias.
 

otroyenero

Active Member
Hombre no pretendía serlo :confused: solo ser sincero en lo que decía. A lo mejor yo estoy pensando en salir y lo mismo salgo y esto tira para arriba. Pero de momento no me quiero precipitar pues tenemos que ajustar esta nueva situación. A lo mejor el € aguanta por encima de 1.25

Así que como siempre digo... cada uno con su salchicha.

Saludos Jesus
Puede que aguante un tiempo en 1.25, pero que pasará cuando EEUU se recupere que lo hará antes que EUR?
De momento parece que aguanta en ese 1.25 a pesar de todo lo que ha soltado el Trichi.
De todas formas, repito gracias por tus opiniones
 

ffrhmd

Member
¿Soluciones?

Solutions For The U.S. Banking System: Nationalization, 'Good/Bad Bank', Or Ring-Fencing of Toxic Assets?

Overview: Geithner aims to add private funding as a new component of proposals to address the toxic debt clogging banks’ balance sheets next to government guarantees of ring-fenced toxic assets. Aspects of the plan that have been settled include a new round of injections of taxpayer funds into banks, targeted at those identified by regulators as most in need of new capital. Previously, the comprehensive solution that aimed at keeping banks in private hands as outlined in Tim Geithner's confirmation hearing was the set-up of an 'aggregator bank' that buys toxic assets. The main sticking point is the toxic asset valuation issue--> markets gain on prospect of easing mark-to-market accounting rules. Major headache is systemic impact of too-big-to-fail banks:


  • Martin Wolf: We are painfully learning that the world’s mega-banks are too complex to manage, too big to fail and too hard to restructure. Nobody would wish to start from here. But, as worries in the stock market show, banks must be fixed, in an orderly and systematic way. The stress tests should be tougher than now planned. Recapitalization must then occur. Call it a banana if you want. But bank restructuring itself must begin (FT)
  • Mar 03: The Obama administration, filling in some of the blanks in its bank bailout, is considering creating multiple investment funds to purchase the bad loans and other distressed assets that lie at the heart of the financial crisis. No decision has been made on the final structure of what the administration is calling a private-public financing partnership, but one leading idea is to establish separate funds to be run by private investment managers. The managers would have to put up a certain amount of capital. Additional financing would come from the government, which would share in any profit or loss
  • These private investment managers would run the funds, deciding which assets to buy and what prices to pay. The government would contribute money from the $700bl bailout, with additional financing likely coming from the Fed and by selling government-backed debt. Other investors, such as pension funds, could also participate. To encourage participation, the government would try to minimize risk for private investors, possibly by offering non-recourse loans
  • The public-private partnership grew out of the "bad bank" concept, an idea popular among some economists that would have required the government alone to buy up the troubled assets. The Obama administration jettisoned that idea after running into the thorny issue of pricing. To help banks, the government must pay enough so that firms don't have to suffer additional losses from selling or writing down the value of other similar assets. But there is little public tolerance for overpaying with taxpayer money
  • Instead, the government wants to encourage private investors to buy up the assets in a way that would come closer to setting a market price where no market currently exists. Some within the administration believe establishing multiple funds could help with that goal. The funds would most likely target all types of assets, such as MBSs, rather than focusing on one specific type of distressed security
  • However, many details remain unclear, in particular, how the government and the private sector will share the risk. An administration official said a key goal is to provide investors with "price safety" so they feel safe enough to get back into the market (WSJ)
  • Amount of toxic assets: WSJ says combination of guarantee and aggegator bank likely, with the latter buying about $2 trillion in toxic assets. Compare with size of U.S. originated shadow banking system pushing for re-intermediation and access to central bank liquidity is $10 trillion (see Geithner speech June 9). Of these, about $6T in U.S., $4t abroad according to Fed research based on flow of funds data (compare with Goldman estimates (not online) that amount of toxic assets in U.S. is at $5.7T). Moreover, IMF notes in October GFSR that $10T is the likely amount of asset deleveraging at global banks. Simon Johnson estimates U.S. bank rescue will cost $3-4T with net cost to taxpayer of about $1-2T or range of 5-10% of GDP as in past banking crises (via Fortune)
  • Loss estimate for U.S. banks: $1.1T in total loan losses, $600-700bn in current mark-to-market losses based on derivatives and cash bond prices. Compare with Chris Whalen (IRA) estimate for accumulated bank charge offs for 2009 in the neighborhood of $1 trillion vs. $1.5 trillion in Tier 1 Risk Based Capital at all US banks. "The good news, though, is that 2/3 to 3/4 of that loss number comes from the top 4 - Citigroup, Bank of America, JPMorganChase and Wells Fargo, in that order of risk profile."
  • Industry proposal with private sector involvement (via Fortune): The idea, as drafted and as articulated by Citigroup's Flexner, is for the government to create a massive new fund to lend money at a fair price to professional investors -- pension funds, hedge funds, private equity funds and endowment funds -- for the sole purpose of providing reliable long-term financing to allow these investors to buy the various "toxic assets" in the secondary market that are now frozen on the balance sheets of financial institutions the world over--> The bet would be that these securities would increase in value over time
  • similarly Michael Jaliman 'MBS Economic Freedom Bonds' (without temporary nationalization) and Luigi Spaventa's Brady Bond proposal to clear toxic asset overhang and sever market and funding liquidity negative feedback loop.
  • Jeffrey Sachs: The bank can be recapitalized at fair value to taxpayers and without inducing a squeeze on bank capital and lending. The government can swap 20 in government bonds for the 20 in toxic assets plus contingent warrants on bank capital, the value of which depends on the eventual sale price of the toxic assets. The government would then dispose of the 20 in toxic assets at a market price over the course of the next year or two and exercise its contingent warrants at that time. During the period of liquidating the toxic assets, the government would exercise a kind of receivership over the banks in order to prevent asset stripping or 'Hail-Mary' incentives on the part of managers --> In this process, there are no taxpayer bailouts, and there is also no squeeze on bank capital resulting from the exchange of toxic assets at less than face value.
  • Nouriel Roubini: in the bad bank model the government may overpay for the bad assets as the true value of them is uncertain; even in the guarantee model there can be such implicit over-payment (or over-guarantee that is not properly priced). Thus, paradoxically nationalization may be a more market friendly solution: it creates the biggest hit for common and preferred shareholders of clearly insolvent institutions and – possibly – even the unsecured creditors in case the bank insolvency is too large; it provides a fair upside to the tax-payer; it can resolve the problem of government managing the bad assets by reselling most of the assets and liabilities of the bank to new private shareholders after a clean-up of the bank.
  • Robert Pozen: Here's a practical solution to the valuation issue: suppose the Treasury estimates that a toxic asset is worth $700,000. It would pay the bank $560,000 in cash (=80%) plus a capital certificate for $140,000 (=20%). If the government later sold that security for $660,000, the bank would receive an additional cash payment of $80,000 (80% of $100,000, the excess of $660,000 over $560,000). The Treasury would receive the remaining $20,000 of the excess. On the other hand, if the government later sold the security for $550,000, the bank would receive nothing more. The Treasury would absorb a loss of $10,000.
  • Willem Buiter (similar arguments by Stiglitz/Romer/Soros): Government should finance and run temporarily one or more good banks, i.e. buy the good assets for which there IS a price by definition and leave the bad assets with the old legacy banks and its shareholders, creditors. Latter will most likely fail and at that point Chapter 7 and 11 are ready--> the state meets its three key objectives: first, its short-run economic stabilisation and crisis-fighting objective; second, its medium and long-term banking sector incentive-enhancing, moral-hazard-minimising objective; and third, its fairness objectives: the polluter pays or, you break it, you own it.
  • Paul Krugman: The only way to make effectively insolvent banks viable again without explicit but temporary government takeover and restructuring is if the government pays much more for toxic assets than private buyers are willing to offer. There is no guarantee that paying near fair value prices will make banks solvent again which would require additional capital injections. A better approach would be to do what the government did with zombie savings and loans at the end of the 1980s: it seized the defunct banks, cleaning out the shareholders. Then it transferred their bad assets to a special institution, the Resolution Trust Corporation; paid off enough of the banks’ debts to make them solvent; and sold the fixed-up banks to new owners.
  • Luigi Zingales: Avoid putting any further taxpayer money at risk at all and mandate a sizable debt to equity swap and adjust distributional issues with equity warrants (change in legislation needed)
.....

sigue..
 
Última edición:

ffrhmd

Member
...

... continua...

  • Nationalization (Swedish Model):
    Pro: write down toxic assets to market value, then nationalize insolvent banks (receivership) in order to align institution's and taxpayer incentives (Zombie banks are likely to engage in gambling), wipe out equity holders (maybe also debt restructuring needed) instead of subsidizing them with taxpayer money, dismiss management, dispose of them via a new RTC (or bad bank), wind down unviable banks, refinance viable ones, start afresh.
    Con: Government is not in the business of running a commercial bank; potentially large upfront government outlays, what do you do with debt holders?, stigma.
  • Backstop guarantee of ring-fenced assets on banks' balance sheets (Citi, BofA):
    Pro: Little upfront outlays for the government
    Con: Open-end government commitment, question of asset valuation unresolved; assets that are good today may turn bad tomorrow (coming loan losses) which may need additional capital, persistent lack of transparency on who holds what, ongoing subsidization of existing share- and debt holders by taxpayers, banks might need additional capital injections.
  • Bad Bank or Aggregator Bank (to be run by FDIC):
    Pro: Government purchase of toxic assets off banks' balance sheets contributes to price discovery and helps deleverage balance sheets.
    Con: Big question is at what price should toxic assets be bought? If government buys at market values, many banks will be insolvent anyway as they have to mark down asset values to new price. If price is too high, taxpayer is once again subsidizing eqyity and debt holders. Bernanke advocates 'hold-to-maturity' prices above current market prices.
  • 'Bad bank' without nationalization and full writedown of toxic assets to market value is reminiscent of Super-SIV that industry did not want to back itself due to asymmetric exposures.
  • IMF: Fair value accounting has its problems but it is still the best option available.
 
Última edición:

YEN-CHF

Member
Ay, Dios mío, compañeros multidiviseros. Por favor, mucha prudencia y mucha paciencia.
YEN-CHF, recuerdo muy bien tu paso a francos porque fui una de las personas que te di mi opinión para decirte que te lo desaconsejaba porque en ese momento estaba "forzadamente" muy barato. Supongo qua aumentarías tu deuda con tu salida del yen (como todos) y si ahora sales del franco te ocurriría lo mismo.
Si necesitas realmente refugiarte en alguna moneda, por supuesto que, como de sobra sabes, la única opción es el euro.
Si quieres aprovechar los grandes recorridos de cotización de las divisas para compensar las pérdidas, piensa en lo difícil que está la cosa. Creo que es esto lo que buscas.

Puede que el dólar se deprecie estrepitosamente, pero puede que se convierta en una divisa prometedora codiciada por todos....
Lo peor es que estamos especulando con nuestras casas y el riesgo es inmenso.
La cosa está fea, y se puede poner más fea.
Yo no tengo ni idea de técnico, luego mi opinión te importará un pimiento pero sólo quería decirte que mi experiencia es ésta:
Entré en CHF a 1.54 y salí a 1.65. Muy bien, rebajé mi deuda.
Entré en JPY a 1.64 y aquí sigo.

Si hubiese permanecido en Francos, mi deuda se hubiera incrementado en 19000 euros y a día de hoy, con mis yenes mi deuda se incrementó más de 50000. La diferencia es enorme.

Seguramente no te servirá de gran cosa mi apunte, pero bueno, son sólo unas líneas más en el foro.
Saludos.
La verdad no fue un buen movimiento, ahora esta mas que claro, pero entonces no tenia seguro de cambio, estaba convencido de que no llegaría al rraly alcista que se "tenía" que dar en navidad, como así fue y me creí lo de que llegabamos a 90-100.

Ahora tengo el seguro y mas margen para cambiar en el momento que me in terese. En CHF aunque se ponga en 1.4 no aumenta demasiado la cuota, (en mi caso la diferencia de 1.49 a 1.4 es de 46 euros) y no me preocupa mucho.

El problema puede ser si no se dan las opciones para volver al YEN con una deuda menor que la que tenía en el momento dle salto y el libor empieza a subir, porque ahi si se nota la diferencia. Lo positivo es que antes de estabilizarse por encima del 2% el libor del CHF estuvo durante 4 años por debajo del 1% y segun esta la situación no parece que vaya a subir a esos niveles.....por ahora.

Lo del cambio al USD es mas que nada por plantear escenarios de posible apreciación, pero no un cambio a niveles de 1.23, tendría que ser a niveles de 1.15 y si los que saben del análisis técnico coincidieran en agotamiento del movimiento apreciatorio, y aun así con mas miedo que otra cosa, porque el USD todavia a dia de hoy es el USD y es la referencia, por mucho que no debiera ser así con la cantidad de billetitos que estan pintando.

Gracias por la opinion a ti y al resto.
 

otroyenero

Active Member
Forex: El euro puede romper por debajo del 1,2500 en los próximos meses, según Danske Bank
viernes, 6 de marzo de 2009, 09:51 GMT
Forex Street. El mercado de divisas

FXstreet.com (Barcelona) - El recorte de tipos del BCE ha incrementado la presión bajista en el euro y el EUR/USD ha explorado momentaneamente la región por debajo del 1,2500, sin embargo el par ha registrado un fuerte rebote al alza hasta situarse por encima del 1,2700 en el inicio de la mañana europea.

Kasper Kirkegaard, de Danske Bank, puntualiza la contradicción entre la recuperación del euro y la caída de los mercados: "El euro estuvo bajo una fuerte presión ayer, siguiendo el recorte de tipos del ECB el EUR/USD cayó temporalmente por debajo del 1,2500. De forma interesante el par se estabilizó al final de la sesión a pesar de la caída de Wall Street, lo que muestra la dificultad de romper el rango de 1,25/1,30 en el que se está moviendo el EUR/USD.

En términos de largo plazo, Kirkegaard espera que el euro logre romper muy por debajo del 1,2500 en los próximos meses: "Aún estamos esperando que el EUR/USD rompa significativamente por debajo del 1,2500 en los próximos meses, el BCE bajará su tipo de interés principal de nuevo y la incertidumbre sobre la estabilidad económica de la CEE se mantiene alta. Si las nóminas no agrícolas sorprenden negativamente hoy, podríamos observar una reacción inversa en el mercado Forex, con el EUR/USD cayendo a pesar de un dato muy negativo en Estados Unidos por ejemplo.
 

mikelg

Member
Sin rumbo...

:) Arkady no me entendiste o me esplique mal. Es evidente lo que comentas y de hecho se esas cifras. Y por eso las comparo con las que tengo sobre usa y me da cuanto menos "grima" :D

En fin de todas maneras y sin profundizar mucho. Dices que recibirán 24500 millones en ayudas no? Bueno indistintamente es un dinero que en teoría se retornara sin entrar evidentemente en cuando ocurrirá eso. Pero te hago otra pregunta. Cuanto se devolvera de los 50.0000.milloncitos del caso madoff por ejemplo :D ..... Y de estos a usa le van a salir alguno mas.

Yo creo que es a parte de crisis una batalla de la informacion que invade los medios. Y ahora toca meternos con eso. Veremos al final quien tiene el pufo mas gordo. Aunque yo ya lo se. jejeje

Un saludo

Pues si...yo también estoy mosca con el dólar....no termina de caer y pensando que a europa le está cayendo gorda, no se que pensar..
de momento me quedo (porque no me queda otra :)
El S&P a tomar por c... y dale que dale, que cojones tienen estos del verde!!!
aunque hoy aguantamos como campeones y el $ le está metiendo al Y...
en fin... de locos.
Jesús; y de dólar a libra??? te lo has planteado...parece que tiene margen...
Saludos y suerte...
€/USD; 1,269...
 

Jesus AT

Well-Known Member
Posi se esta bien en la nevera eing? :D mas tranquilo al menos Fran. Y ademas lejos del intra......

¿Quien lo tiene? "¡Sshhh, dilo bajito!"....
¡Que frio hace , es invierno joder! ;)
Bueno tenemos mas de lo mismo, la conclusión seria que el $ tiene que terminar por caer cual castillo naipes..... pero no lo hace amigo no lo hace :(

A partir de Bretton Woods, cuando los países tienen déficits en sus balanza de pagos, deben financiarlos a través de las reservas internacionales o mediante el otorgamiento de préstamos que concede el Fondo Monetario Internacional. Para eso fue creado. Para tener acceso a esos préstamos los países deben acordar sus políticas económicas con el FMI.

Esto es una "putada" con perdón pues parte de los acuerdos tomados hacen hincapié en que incluso "existe" la obligacion de que digase "resto del mundo" tienen la obligacion de "sostener" llegado el momento la cotizacion de nuestro odiado $ :D pero no, resulta que no. Es mas podríamos decir que parte del problema que tiene japón es no poder devaluar su moneda pues ello implica arrastrar al dolar.

Y esto como nos deja? evidentemente MAL REQUETE MAL pues tenemos a Japón con su castigo por decisiones tomadas en el pasado por su burbuja y a usa como unas castañuelas DECIDIENDO lo mismo que Japón hizo en su día pero con el respaldo de que el resto de economías del mundo mundial TIENEN LA PUT_ obligacion de sostener dicha economía............ lo dicho frustrante pues usa está tomando las mismas medidas que japon pero el correctivo al menos de momento no le llega.....

Me da que no perderemos esos 1,25 Otroyenero. Es mas ahora mismo están dando operaciones especulativas en euro dolar se pelea con la resistencia de 1.27 ahora todos quieren hacer sus monedas fuertes, los usa quieren el dolar fuerte para la deuda y los chinos juegan con su moneda como les da la gana. Pero con un apunte. Están hasta los huevos de los usa y a punto de mandar al $ a TPC ..... veremos como terminan..... Pues después de lo de ayer es evidente que estaba descontada esa rebaja del 0,5% y hoy tenemos al € gallito. INCOMPRENSIBLE.....

Puede que aguante un tiempo en 1.25, pero que pasará cuando EEUU se recupere que lo hará antes que EUR?
De momento parece que aguanta en ese 1.25 a pesar de todo lo que ha soltado el Trichi.
De todas formas, repito gracias por tus opiniones
La libra es una opción si Mikelg pero no tengo divisa...... ya sabes que opino de ir a pelo..... Ahora mismo gaste el cartucho que tenia....... tengo estudiarlo pues es cierto que esta a tiro....

Pues si...yo también estoy mosca con el dólar....no termina de caer y pensando que a europa le está cayendo gorda, no se que pensar..
de momento me quedo (porque no me queda otra :)
El S&P a tomar por c... y dale que dale, que cojones tienen estos del verde!!!
aunque hoy aguantamos como campeones y el $ le está metiendo al Y...
en fin... de locos.
Jesús; y de dólar a libra??? te lo has planteado...parece que tiene margen...
Saludos y suerte...
€/USD; 1,269...
En fin saludos sin excepcion......

EDITO. Por cierto un apunte..... Faltaria que cambiaran su pauta en esta crisis jejeje pa morirse!.... en fin lo dicho buen finde.

Decía Donald Kemmerer que el Gobierno de Estados Unidos, cuando se enfrentaba a un problema económico que desconocía, hacía lo mismo que aquel médico que inducía la fiebre a sus pacientes porque era lo único que sabía tratar.


Kemmerer recuerda que tanto en 1933, cuando el país se enfrentaba a una deflación, como en 1973, cuando corría el riesgo de padecer una hiperinflación, la solución que adoptaron las autoridades estadounidenses fue la misma: devaluar el dólar.
 
Última edición:

pesga08

Active Member
he puesto algunos post en el hilo del yen, ¿qué pensais?, pero lo que el crédito suprime te quita, puede ser que el crédito suprime te lo de.
Vosotros pesnais, que es una buena opción cómo no sabemos en que se va a financiar los EEUU, sería en dólares, y luego cambiarse a la moneda más depreciada con respecto a ellos por cuota, y acto seguido pasarse a euros con seguro de cambio. No sé cómo se hace con más de dos pares ¿es así, qué pensáis?
 

Kaoyen

Member
Jesús o alguien que nos diga cuanto puede subir el € después de perforar la resistencia? cual puede ser el máximo ?

Saludos.
 
Arriba